Fear of Holes

@article{Cole2013FearOH,
  title={Fear of Holes},
  author={Geoff G. Cole and Arnold J. Wilkins},
  journal={Psychological Science},
  year={2013},
  volume={24},
  pages={1980 - 1985}
}
Phobias are usually described as irrational and persistent fears of certain objects or situations, and causes of such fears are difficult to identify. We describe an unusual but common phobia (trypophobia), hitherto unreported in the scientific literature, in which sufferers are averse to images of holes. We performed a spectral analysis on a variety of images that induce trypophobia and found that the stimuli had a spectral composition typically associated with uncomfortable visual images… 

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