Fear and Trembling

@inproceedings{KierkegaardFearAT,
  title={Fear and Trembling},
  author={Soren Aabye Kierkegaard}
}
Writing under the pseudonym of Johannes de silentio, Kierkegaard uses the form of a dialectical lyric to present his conception of faith. Abraham is portrayed as a great man, who chose to sacrifice his son, Isaac, in the face of conflicting expectations and in defiance of any conceivable ethical standard. The infamous and controversial 'teleological suspension of the ethical' challenged the contemporary views of Hegel's universal moral system, and the suffering individual must alone make a… Expand
The Relation between Faith and Ethics in Kierkegaard's Fear and Trembling 1
In Fear and Trembling, through the pseudonym Johannes De Silentio and based on the biblical story of the “binding of Isaac,” Kierkegaard discusses the relation between faith and ethics. According toExpand
II—John Lippitt: What Neither abraham nor Johannes de Silentio Could Say
Though there are significant points of overlap between Michelle Kosch's reading of Fear and Trembling and my own, this paper focuses primarily on a significant difference: the legitimacy or otherwiseExpand
Meta-ethical and Liberatory Dimensions of Tragedy: A Schutzean Portrait
Tragedy is an ideal typification of a number of aesthetic mixed types. This ideal mixture affords a correlated mixture in the antisocial world of colonialism and neo-colonialism. Investigated from aExpand
Talking Cures: A Lacanian Reading of Hegel and Kierkegaard on Language and Madness
In examining Hegel's and Kierkegaard's theories of language, I argue that both entail conceptions of the therapeutic power of language to heal us from madness and despair. I show that whereas HegelExpand
The Philosophy of Tragedy: From Plato to Žižek
This book is a full survey of the philosophy of tragedy from antiquity to the present. From Aristotle to Žižek the focal question has been: why, in spite of its distressing content, do we valueExpand
The moral implications of Kierkegaard's analysis of despair
Abstract Kierkegaard's The Sickness unto Death famously characterizes despair as the sickness of any human being who does not live a life of faith. Kierkegaard supports this claim by providing aExpand
Duméry’s Philosophy of Religion: Critique of the Categories and Schemes Which Express the Spirit’s Constitutive Exigency of the Transordinal One
The previous chapter delineated Dumery’s refusal to acknowledge the transcendent and absolute Being of analogical theology, and his substitution of the transcendent and absolute One of negativeExpand
Freud's Meeting with Rabbi Alexandre Safran
Sigmund Freud went to considerable effort to disguise his knowledge of the Hebrew language and Jewish primary sources. In this way he tried to prevent his new creation, psychoanalysis, from beingExpand
Deleuze and Philosophy of Religion
While Deleuze’s philosophy is not ostensibly religious, he is not overtly hostile either to religion or metaphysics. While these subjects do not feature prominently in his reflections, he provides anExpand
Paternal Function and Thirdness in Psychoanalysis and Legend: Has the Future Been Foretold?
  • R. Perelberg
  • Philosophy, Medicine
  • The Psychoanalytic quarterly
  • 2013
TLDR
The Akedah, the biblical narrative of the Binding of Isaac, is examined, and it is suggested that this story may be interpreted as inaugurating paternal function and thirdness, and time is an essential element in establishing thirdness. Expand
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References

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Cf. Journal IV A
  • Cf. Journal IV A
  • 1837
Cf. Journal IV A
  • Cf. Journal IV A
  • 1837
's father increased his fortune by investing in bonds issued by the Crown (i.e. on the credit of the absolute sovereign), and in a later crisis S.K. lost much of his by investing in the same security
  • 's father increased his fortune by investing in bonds issued by the Crown (i.e. on the credit of the absolute sovereign), and in a later crisis S.K. lost much of his by investing in the same security
's word, and here it means, leaping from one point to another so as to illuminate the subject from all sides, or in order that the intelligibility might be broken down into its several parts
  • 's word, and here it means, leaping from one point to another so as to illuminate the subject from all sides, or in order that the intelligibility might be broken down into its several parts
(I know not for what reason) applies here to the Greek soothsayers
  • (I know not for what reason) applies here to the Greek soothsayers
11 Genesis, Chapter 22
  • 11 Genesis, Chapter 22
12 Judith 10:11. S.K. quotes this passage in the Postscript. Cf. III A 197
  • 12 Judith 10:11. S.K. quotes this passage in the Postscript. Cf. III A 197
14 It is evident from the sequel that Jeremiah is meant. 15 Here we have a glimpse of "repetition." 16 Cf. Plato's Phaedrus
  • 14 It is evident from the sequel that Jeremiah is meant. 15 Here we have a glimpse of "repetition." 16 Cf. Plato's Phaedrus
17 In Oelenschläger's play Alladin the hero is contrasted with Noureddin the representative of darkness
  • 17 In Oelenschläger's play Alladin the hero is contrasted with Noureddin the representative of darkness
19 Themistocles, as related in Plutarch's Themistocles
  • 19 Themistocles, as related in Plutarch's Themistocles
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