• Corpus ID: 19317457

Fatty acid composition and energy density of foods available to African hominids. Evolutionary implications for human brain development.

@article{Cordain2001FattyAC,
  title={Fatty acid composition and energy density of foods available to African hominids. Evolutionary implications for human brain development.},
  author={Loren Cordain and Bruce A. Watkins and Neil J. Mann},
  journal={World review of nutrition and dietetics},
  year={2001},
  volume={90},
  pages={
          144-61
        }
}

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