Father time. II. A physical basis behind Feynman's idea of antiparticles moving backward in time, and an extension of the CPT theorem to include non-local gauge fields

@article{Dastidar1999FatherTI,
  title={Father time. II. A physical basis behind Feynman's idea of antiparticles moving backward in time, and an extension of the CPT theorem to include non-local gauge fields},
  author={T. Dastidar and K. R. Dastidar},
  journal={arXiv: High Energy Physics - Theory},
  year={1999}
}
It has been demonstrated in a recent paper (Mod.Phys.Lett. A13, 1265 (1998); hep-th/9902020) that the existence of a non-thermodynamic arrow of time at the atomic level is a fundamental requirement for conservation of energy in matter-radiation interaction. Since the universe consists of two things only --- energy and massive matter --- we argue that as a consequence of this earlier result, particles and antiparticles must necessarily move in opposite directions in time. Our result further… 

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