Fathead minnows use chemical cues to discriminate natural shoalmates from unfamiliar conspecifics

@article{Brown2005FatheadMU,
  title={Fathead minnows use chemical cues to discriminate natural shoalmates from unfamiliar conspecifics},
  author={Grant E Brown and R. Jan F. Smith},
  journal={Journal of Chemical Ecology},
  year={2005},
  volume={20},
  pages={3051-3061}
}
Naturally occurring shoals of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were captured and individuals given the choice between shoalmates and unfamiliar conspecifics in a two-choice discrimination test. When presented with chemosensory cues alone or with both chemosensory and visual cues, minnows exhibited a significant preference for shoalmates versus unfamiliar conspecifics. With visual cues alone, there was no significant discrimination of shoalmates. A second set of trials was conducted to… 

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