Fatal Pediatric Head Injuries Caused by Short-Distance Falls

@article{Plunkett2001FatalPH,
  title={Fatal Pediatric Head Injuries Caused by Short-Distance Falls},
  author={John Plunkett},
  journal={The American Journal of Forensic Medicine and Pathology},
  year={2001},
  volume={22},
  pages={1-12}
}
  • J. Plunkett
  • Published 2001
  • Medicine
  • The American Journal of Forensic Medicine and Pathology
Physicians disagree on several issues regarding head injury in infants and children, including the potential lethality of a short-distance fall, a lucid interval in an ultimately fatal head injury, and the specificity of retinal hemorrhage for inflicted trauma. There is scant objective evidence to resolve these questions, and more information is needed. The objective of this study was to determine whether there are witnessed or investigated fatal short-distance falls that were concluded to be… Expand
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  • Medicine
  • Biomedical journal
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The "New Science" of Abusive Head Trauma.
TLDR
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Retinal hemorrhages in children following fatal motor vehicle crashes: a case series.
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