Fatal Naegleria fowleri infection acquired in Minnesota: possible expanded range of a deadly thermophilic organism.

@article{Kemble2012FatalNF,
  title={Fatal Naegleria fowleri infection acquired in Minnesota: possible expanded range of a deadly thermophilic organism.},
  author={Sarah K Kemble and Ruth Lynfield and Aaron S. DeVries and Dennis M Drehner and William F Pomputius and Michael J. Beach and Govinda S. Visvesvara and Alexandre Janu{\'a}rio da Silva and Vincent R. Hill and Jonathan S. Yoder and Lihua Xiao and Kirk E. Smith and Richard N. Danila},
  journal={Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America},
  year={2012},
  volume={54 6},
  pages={805-9}
}
BACKGROUND Primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), caused by the free-living ameba Naegleria fowleri, has historically been associated with warm freshwater exposures at lower latitudes of the United States. In August 2010, a Minnesota resident, aged 7 years, died of rapidly progressive meningoencephalitis after local freshwater exposures, with no history of travel outside the state. PAM was suspected on the basis of amebae observed in cerebrospinal fluid. METHODS Water and sediment samples… CONTINUE READING
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