Fasting in the ureotelic Lake Magadi tilapia, Alcolapia grahami, does not reduce its high metabolic demand, increasing its vulnerability to siltation events

@article{DeBoeck2019FastingIT,
  title={Fasting in the ureotelic Lake Magadi tilapia, Alcolapia grahami, does not reduce its high metabolic demand, increasing its vulnerability to siltation events},
  author={Gudrun De Boeck and Chris M. Wood and Kevin V. Brix and Amit Sinha and Victoria Matey and Ora E. Johannsson and Adalto Bianchini and Lucas F Bianchini and John Ndegwa Maina and Geraldine D Kavembe and Michael B Papah and Mosiany Letura Kisipan and Rodi Omondi Ojoo},
  journal={Conservation Physiology},
  year={2019},
  volume={7}
}
Abstract Lake Magadi, Kenya, is one of the most extreme aquatic environments on Earth (pH~10, anoxic to hyperoxic, high temperatures). Recently, increased water demand and siltation have threatened the viable hot springs near the margins of the lake where Alcolapia grahami, the only fish surviving in the lake, live. These Lake Magadi tilapia largely depend on nitrogen-rich cyanobacteria for food and are 100% ureotelic. Their exceptionally high aerobic metabolic rate, together with their… 
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