Farming and Language in Island Southeast Asia

@article{Donohue2010FarmingAL,
  title={Farming and Language in Island Southeast Asia},
  author={Mark Donohue and Tim Denham},
  journal={Current Anthropology},
  year={2010},
  volume={51},
  pages={223 - 256}
}
Current portrayals of Island Southeast Asia (ISEA) over the past 5,000 years are dominated by discussion of the Austronesian “farming/language dispersal,” with associated linguistic replacement, genetic clines, Neolithic “packages,” and social transformations. The alternative framework that we present improves our understanding of the nature of the Austronesian language dispersal from Taiwan and better accords with the population genetics, archaeological evidence, and crop domestication… Expand
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The origins of agriculture have been debated by archaeologists for most of the discipline’s history, no more so than in Island Southeast Asia. The orthodox view is that Neolithic farmers spread southExpand
The dispersal of Austronesian languages in Island South East Asia: Current findings and debates
  • M. Klamer
  • Geography, Computer Science
  • Lang. Linguistics Compass
  • 2019
TLDR
The conclusion is that historical linguistics is currently not in the position to provide information about higher order temporal and spatial relations between speaker groups within ISEA, unlike that which the language/farming dispersal hypothesis suggests. Expand
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TLDR
It is shown that, in total, about 20 % of mtDNA lineages in the modern ISEA pool result from the “out-of-Taiwan” dispersal, with most of the remainder signifying earlier processes, mainly due to sea-level rises after the Last Glacial Maximum. Expand
Resolving the ancestry of Austronesian-speaking populations
TLDR
A primarily common ancestry for Taiwan/ISEA populations established before the Neolithic, but also detected clear signals of two minor Late Holocene migrations, probably representing Neolithic input from both Mainland Southeast Asia and South China, via Taiwan. Expand
Reconstructing Austronesian population history in Island Southeast Asia
TLDR
It is shown that all sampled Austronesian groups harbour ancestry that is more closely related to aboriginal Taiwanese than to any present-day mainland population, suggesting that either there was once a substantial Austro-Asiatic presence in Island Southeast Asia, orAustronesian speakers migrated to and through the mainland, admixing there before continuing to western Indonesia. Expand
Reconstructing Austronesian population history in Island Southeast Asia
TLDR
It is shown that all sampled Austronesian groups harbor ancestry that is more closely related to aboriginal Taiwanese than to any present-day mainland population, suggesting that either there was once a substantial Austro-Asiatic presence in Island Southeast Asia, or Austronesians migrated to and through the mainland, admixing there before continuing to western Indonesia. Expand
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