Farmers at the Heart of the ‘Human Capital Revolution’? Decomposing the Numeracy Increase in Early Modern Europe

@article{Tollnek2017FarmersAT,
  title={Farmers at the Heart of the ‘Human Capital Revolution’? Decomposing the Numeracy Increase in Early Modern Europe},
  author={Franziska Tollnek and Joerg Baten},
  journal={ERN: Human Capital (Topic)},
  year={2017}
}
Did the early development of skills and numerical abilities occur primarily in urban centres and among the elite groups of society? This study assesses the human capital of different occupational groups in the early modern period and partially confirms this finding: skilled and professional groups had higher levels of numeracy and literacy than persons in unskilled occupations. However, there was another large group that developed substantial human capital and represented around one-third of… 
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Review of Periodical Literature Published in 2002
No abstract available.
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