Famotidine vs. omeprazole: a prospective randomized multicentre trial to determine efficacy in non‐erosive gastro‐oesophageal reflux disease

@article{Fujiwara2005FamotidineVO,
  title={Famotidine vs. omeprazole: a prospective randomized multicentre trial to determine efficacy in non‐erosive gastro‐oesophageal reflux disease},
  author={Yasuhiro Fujiwara and Kazuhide Higuchi and Hiroko Nebiki and Shinji Chono and H. Uno and Keiichi Kitada and Hiroshi Satoh and K Nakagawa and K. Kobayashi and K Tominaga and T. Watanabe and Nobuhide Oshitani and Tetsuo Arakawa},
  journal={Alimentary Pharmacology \& Therapeutics},
  year={2005},
  volume={21}
}
Background : Several studies in Western countries showed that proton‐pump inhibitors are superior to histamine2‐receptor antagonists or placebo in the treatment of non‐erosive gastro‐oesophageal reflux disease. The efficacy of acid‐suppressive drugs for non‐erosive gastro‐oesophageal reflux disease in Japan, in which the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection is higher compared with Western countries, is unknown. 
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