Family history studies: V. The genetics of mania.

@article{Reich1969FamilyHS,
  title={Family history studies: V. The genetics of mania.},
  author={Theodore Reich and Paula J. Clayton and George Winokur},
  journal={The American journal of psychiatry},
  year={1969},
  volume={125 10},
  pages={
          1358-69
        }
}
In this study of the families of 59 manic-depressive, manic type probands, the predominant affective illness among the family members was depression without mania, although mania was frequent. The findings suggest that genetic transmission occurred by a sex-linked single or double dominant gene. In two families affective disorder was linked to color blindness, implying that the X-linked gene for manic-depressive psychosis is on the short arm of the X chromosome. 

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