Family Provisioning Is Not the Only Reason Men Hunt

@article{Hawkes2010FamilyPI,
  title={Family Provisioning Is Not the Only Reason Men Hunt},
  author={Kristen Hawkes and James F. O'connell and James E. Coxworth},
  journal={Current Anthropology},
  year={2010},
  volume={51},
  pages={259 - 264}
}
Gurven and Hill (2009) ask, “Why do men hunt?” As they say, “The observation that men hunt and women gather supported the simplistic view of marriage as a cooperative enterprise. Greater sophistication suggests that males may often be motivated by mating and status rather than offspring investment” (p. 60). We agree (e.g., Hawkes 1990, 1991; Hawkes et al. 1991, 2001a, 2001b). This is the revision we first proposed nearly 20 years ago (Hawkes 1990) and have elaborated several times since. Having… 
Moving beyond Stereotypes of Men's Foraging Goals
We concur with the title of the Hawkes, O’Connell, and Coxworth discussion, “Family provisioning is not the only reason men hunt” (Hawkes et al. 2010). We said so explicitly in our paper, and we
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Here a review of honest signaling theory in both hunter‐gatherer studies and zoology highlights three issues with the costly signaling literature in hunter‐gather studies: an overemphasis on the demonstration of realized costs, a lack of clear predictions about what specific qualities hunting actually signals, and an insufficient focus on the broadcast effectiveness of hunting and its value as a heuristics for signal recipients.
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The absence of an association between hunting reputation and nutritional status is consistent with generalized food sharing and adds to a substantial corpus of existing research that identifies few nutritional advantages to being or marrying a well-reputed Hadza hunter.
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Why do men seek status? Fitness payoffs to dominance and prestige
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Multivariate analysis suggests men are motivated to pursue status because of fitness gains both within and outside of marital unions: dominant and prestigious men have more in-pair surviving offspring as well as more extra-marital affairs.
The Sexual Division of Labor
Many evolutionary arguments fossilize a human division of labor as one of man the hunter, and woman the gatherer, with differences in labor arising out of the effectiveness of efficiency. We suggest
Provisioning offspring and others: risk–energy trade-offs and gender differences in hunter–gatherer foraging strategies
TLDR
How resources vary in their expected daily energetic returns and in the variance or risk around those returns is examined to suggest that men's and women's foraging interests converge when high- energy resources can be reliably acquired, but diverge when higher-energy resources are associated with higher levels of risk.
The Effects of Wealth on Male Reproduction among Monogamous Hunter-Fisher-Trappers in Northern Siberia
Variability in men’s reproductive success (RS) is partly attributable to the ability of successful men to influence resource flows relevant to the mate choice and reproduction of women. This study
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References

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The transfer of food among group members is a ubiquitous feature of small-scale forager and forager-agricultural populations. The uniqueness of pervasive sharing among humans, especially among
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