False Confessions

@article{Kassin2008FalseC,
  title={False Confessions},
  author={Saul M Kassin},
  journal={Current Directions in Psychological Science},
  year={2008},
  volume={17},
  pages={249 - 253}
}
  • S. Kassin
  • Published 2008
  • Psychology
  • Current Directions in Psychological Science
Despite the commonsense belief that people do not confess to crimes they did not commit, 20 to 25% of all DNA exonerations involve innocent prisoners who confessed. After distinguishing between voluntary, compliant, and internalized false confessions, this article suggests that a sequence of three processes is responsible for false confessions and their adverse consequences. First, police sometimes target innocent people for interrogation because of erroneous judgments of truth and deception… Expand

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References

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Confession Evidence
TLDR
Research reviewed in this article suggests the following: Despite special training in how to conduct interviews, police cannot distinguish better than the layperson whether suspects are lying or telling the truth. Expand
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Basic questions are raised concerning police interrogations, the risk of false confessions, and the impact that such evidence has on a jury. On the basis of available research, it was concluded thatExpand
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  • S. Kassin
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • The American psychologist
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TLDR
It appears that innocence puts innocents at risk, that consideration should be given to reforming current practices, and that a policy of videotaping interrogations is a necessary means of protection. Expand
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A puzzle is raised by cases of false confessions: How could an innocent on convincingly confess to a crime? Postconviction DNA testing has now exonerated over 250 convicts, more than forty of whomExpand
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An experiment demonstrated that false incriminating evidence can lead people to accept guilt for a crime they did not commit Subjects in a fast- or slow-paced reaction time task were accused ofExpand
“I’d Know a False Confession if I Saw One”: A Comparative Study of College Students and Police Investigators
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Students were generally more accurate than police, and accuracy rates were higher among those presented with audiotaped than videotaped confessions, and investigators were significantly more confident in their judgments and also prone to judge confessors guilty. Expand
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TLDR
Results showed that although the detective's demeanor had no effect, participants who were truly innocent were significantly more likely to sign a waiver than those who were guilty. Expand
Police-Induced Confessions: Risk Factors and Recommendations
TLDR
This article concludes with a strong recommendation for the mandatory electronic recording of interrogations and considers other possibilities for the reform of interrogation practices and the protection of vulnerable suspect populations. Expand
On the Presumption of Evidentiary Independence
TLDR
These findings challenge the presumption in law that different forms of evidence are independent and suggest an important overlooked mechanism by which innocent confessors are wrongfully convicted: Potentially exculpatory evidence is corrupted by a confession itself. Expand
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TLDR
Results indicated that guilty persons were more likely to confess than innocent persons, and that the use of minimization and the offer of a deal increased the rate of both true and false confessions. Expand
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