Fake news, fast and slow: Deliberation reduces belief in false (but not true) news headlines.

@article{Bag2020FakeNF,
  title={Fake news, fast and slow: Deliberation reduces belief in false (but not true) news headlines.},
  author={Bence Bag{\'o} and David G. Rand and Gordon Pennycook},
  journal={Journal of experimental psychology. General},
  year={2020}
}
What role does deliberation play in susceptibility to political misinformation and "fake news"? The Motivated System 2 Reasoning (MS2R) account posits that deliberation causes people to fall for fake news, because reasoning facilitates identity-protective cognition and is therefore used to rationalize content that is consistent with one's political ideology. The classical account of reasoning instead posits that people ineffectively discern between true and false news headlines when they fail… 

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