Failure of direction discrimination at detection threshold for both fast and slow chromatic motion

@article{Metha1998FailureOD,
  title={Failure of direction discrimination at detection threshold for both fast and slow chromatic motion},
  author={Andrew B. Metha and Kathy T. Mullen},
  journal={Journal of The Optical Society of America A-optics Image Science and Vision},
  year={1998},
  volume={15},
  pages={2945-2950}
}
  • A. Metha, K. Mullen
  • Published 1 December 1998
  • Biology
  • Journal of The Optical Society of America A-optics Image Science and Vision
Separate pathways have recently been proposed for “fast” and “slow” motion, whose properties differ in the way that color contrast is processed [see Nature (London)367, 268 (1994); Trends Neurosci.19, 394 (1996); and Vision Res.36, 1281 (1996) and Vision Res.35, 1547 (1995)]. One reported difference is that for slow motion the direction of chromatic stimuli cannot be determined at detection threshold, whereas at higher temporal rates detection and direction discrimination threshold coincide… 

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