Failed back surgery syndrome.

@article{Chan2011FailedBS,
  title={Failed back surgery syndrome.},
  author={Chin-wern Chan and Philip Wenn Hsin Peng},
  journal={Pain medicine},
  year={2011},
  volume={12 4},
  pages={
          577-606
        }
}
BACKGROUND Failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) is a chronic pain condition that has considerable impact on the patient and health care system. Despite advances in surgical technology, the rates of failed back surgery have not declined. The factors contributing to the development of this entity may occur in the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative periods. Due to the severe pain and disability this syndrome may cause, more radical treatments have been utilized. Recent trials have been… CONTINUE READING
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