Fagaceous Flowers, Fruits, and Cupules from the Campanian (Late Cretaceous) of Central Georgia, USA

@article{Herendeen1995FagaceousFF,
  title={Fagaceous Flowers, Fruits, and Cupules from the Campanian (Late Cretaceous) of Central Georgia, USA},
  author={Patrick S. Herendeen and Peter R. Crane and Andrew N. Drinnan},
  journal={International Journal of Plant Sciences},
  year={1995},
  volume={156},
  pages={93 - 116}
}
A new genus of fossil angiosperms (Protofagacea allonensis gen. et sp. nov.) is established for staminate flowers with associated fruits and cupules from the Campanian (Late Cretaceous) Buffalo Creek Member of the Gaillard Formation in central Georgia, U.S.A. Staminate flowers are typically borne in sevenflowered dichasia (more rarely three- or five-flowered) subtended by three series of bracts. Flowers have six small imbricate tepals in two cycles of three, 12 stamens in two cycles of six, and… 
New Genus of Fossil Fagaceae from the Santonian (Late Cretaceous) of Central Georgia, U. S. A.
TLDR
The discovery of Antiquacupula, in addition to Protofagacea, indicates an early divergence of at least two lineages within the Fagaceae, both with cupules, by the Santonian.
Fossil flowers and fruits of the Actinidiaceae from the Campanian (Late Cretaceous) of Georgia
TLDR
Results of this analysis place Parasaurauia allonensis within the Actinidiaceae as sister to the extant genera Saurauia and Actinidia and place the fossil within the Ericales.
Allonia decandra: Floral remains of the tribeHamamelideae (Hamamelidaceae) from Campanian strata of southeastern USA
TLDR
The occurrence of fossils assignable to Loropetalinae during the Campanian documents the existence of Hamamelidaceae with a level of floral organization and character evolution equivalent to that of extant genera, early in the evolutionary history of the family.
Fossil Flowers of Fagales from the Kamikitaba Locality (Early Coniacian; Late Cretaceous) of Northeastern Japan
TLDR
Fossil flowers and fruits of Archaefagacea futabensis provide the earliest evidence of floral structure among those Fagales (Fagales, Nothofagaceae, and extinct taxa) that fall outside the group of six extant families and related fossil Normapolles plants that constitute the core Fagale.
Organogenesis of the Inflorescence and Flowers in Platycarya strobilacea (Juglandaceae)
TLDR
This is the first SEM study to show the whole developmental process of male, female, and bisexual flowers in a member of the Fagales and to investigate organogenesis of inflorescence and flowers with scanning electron microscopy.
Sporophytes and Gametophytes of Polytrichaceae from the Campanian (Late Cretaceous) of Georgia, U. S. A.
TLDR
These fossils, which represent the first unequivocal polytrichaceous sporophytes known from the fossil record, provide the first definitive evidence of modern families of mosses in the Cretaceous and demonstrate that mosses were already diverse by approximately 80 million years before present.
Androdecidua endressii gen. et sp. nov., from the Late Cretaceous of Georgia (United States): Further Floral Diversity in Hamamelidoideae (Hamamelidaceae)
TLDR
The presence of a long apical extension of the connective and the valvate anther dehiscence indicate the affinity of A. endressii with the genera of subtribe Loropetalinae (Hamamelideae; Hamamelidaceae) and the level of synorganization of the corolla and androecium and the presence of two structural types of anthers are characters previously unknown among Hamamelids.
Sporophytes and gametophytes of Dicranaceae from the Santonian (Late Cretaceous) of Georgia, USA.
TLDR
Campylopodium allonense unequivocally provides the earliest evidence of Dicranaceae in the fossil record, and along with other fossil mosses from this late Santonian locality, indicates the presence of modern families of mosses in the Cretaceous.
Two new Castanopsis (Fagaceae) species based on cupule and foliage from the upper Miocene of eastern Zhejiang, China
TLDR
Two new species are described from fossil specimens collected from the upper Miocene Shengxian Formation, Zhejiang Province, Southeast China, where Castanopsis praeouonbiensis and C. praefissa became extinct in this area because of the cooling climate from the late Miocene to the present day in Zhe Jiang Province.
Cascadiacarpa exilis sp. nov.: new fruits of Fagaceae from the Eocene of British Columbia
TLDR
More than 800 permineralized fagaceous fruits have been studied from the Eocene Appian Way locality of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, and the single-fruited, spiny cupule is most similar to fruits of Fagaceae subfamily Castaneoideae.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 92 REFERENCES
Lauraceous Flowers from the Potomac Group (Mid-Cretaceous) of Eastern North America
TLDR
Mauldinia mirabilis is the first unequivocal documentation of Lauraceae from the Cretaceous and provides further evidence for considerable diversity among magnoliid dicotyledons at an early phase in angiosperm diversification.
Chloranthus-like stamens from the upper Cretaceous of New Jersey
TLDR
Fossil angiospermous stamens with in situ pollen from the Turonian of New Jersey are described and assigned to the Chloranthaceae, which is one of several families that have been of special interest in studies of the origin and early diversification of angiosperms.
Fruits from the mid-cretaceous of north america with pollen grains of the clavatipollenites type
TLDR
Fruit and seed characters indicate that Couperites is more closely related to Chloranthaceae than to any other magnoliid family, and support the systematic affinity sugge of the genus.
Archaenthus: An Early Angiosperm From the Cenomanian of the Western Interior of North America
Archaeanthus linnenbergeri Dilcher & Crane, gen. et sp. nov., a multifollicular angiosperm fruit, is described from the mid-Cretaceous (uppermost Albian-mid-Cenomanian) Dakota Formation of central
Palaeobotanical evidence on the early radiation of magnoliid angiosperms
TLDR
This paper focuses on floral organs showing magnoliid features, some of which may be compared to extant taxa, at least at the level of order and perhaps family, from the Puddledock locality, Virginia, eastern USA.
THE INFLORESCENCE OF FAGUS AND CASTANEA, AND THE EVOLUTION OF THE CUPULES OF THE FAGACEAE
TLDR
The status of the cupule of Fagus as the primitive type is upheld by a general lack of specialization in this genus as regards secondary xylem, cotyledons, some floral characters, and the manner in which the inflorescences are borne.
Oldest fossil flowers of hamamelidaceous affinity, from the Late Cretaceous of New Jersey.
TLDR
The appearance of the character complex embodied in these flowers during the late mid-Cretaceous may signal the early stages of the relationship between specialized pollinators, such as bees, and the hamamelid-rosid-asterid lineage of angiosperms, arguably one of the most important events in angiosperm radiation.
ATTACHED LEAVES, INFLORESCENCES, AND FRUITS OF FAGOPSIS, AN EXTINCT GENUS OF FAGACEOUS AFFINITY FROM THE OLIGOCENE FLORISSANT FLORA OF COLORADO, U.S.A.
TLDR
The striking differences in fruiting structures between Fagopsis and extant Fagaeeae parallel the differenees between the extant genera Platyearya and Juglans in the Juglandaeeae, and Alnus and Corylus in the Betulaeeae.
Upper Cretaceous (Senonian) floral structures of juglandalean affinity containing normapolles pollen
Abstract Fossil angiosperm floral structures containing pollen grains referred to the Normapolles group are described from the Upper Cretaceous (Senonian) of southern Sweden. They represent the first
LATE CRETACEOUS FOSSIL FLOWERS OF ERICALEAN AFFINITY
TLDR
Fossilized flowers of ericalean affinity are reported from the Turonian of New Jersey, and are the oldest known floral remains of Ericales, raising the possibility that such specific pollinator-plant relationships had developed by the mid-Cretaceous.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...