Factors predictive of regret in sex reassignment

@article{Landn1998FactorsPO,
  title={Factors predictive of regret in sex reassignment},
  author={Mika{\'e}l Land{\'e}n and Jan W{\aa}linder and Gunnar Hambert and Bengt Lundstr{\"o}m},
  journal={Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica},
  year={1998},
  volume={97}
}
The objective of this study was to evaluate the features and calculate the frequency of sex‐reassigned subjects who had applied for reversal to their biological sex, and to compare these with non‐regretful subjects. An inception cohort was retrospectively identified consisting of all subjects with gender identity disorder who were approved for sex reassignment in Sweden during the period 1972‐1992. The period of time that elapsed between the application and this evaluation ranged from 4 to 24… 

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