Factors influencing host nest use by the brood parasitic Asian Koel (Eudynamys scolopacea)

@article{Begum2011FactorsIH,
  title={Factors influencing host nest use by the brood parasitic Asian Koel (Eudynamys scolopacea)},
  author={Sajeda Begum and Arne Moksnes and Eivin R{\o}skaft and B{\aa}rd G Stokke},
  journal={Journal of Ornithology},
  year={2011},
  volume={152},
  pages={793-800}
}
Host nest use by the brood parasitic Asian Koel (Eudynamys scolopacea) has not previously been studied in detail. Here, we investigated factors that may explain patterns of nest use among three commonly used host species of the Asian Koel in Bangladesh; Long-tailed Shrikes (Lanius schach), House Crows (Corvus splendens) and Common Mynas (Acridotheres tristis). In all three host species, the risk of parasitism increased significantly as the distances between host nests and potential parasite… 

Interactions between the Asian koel (Eudynamys scolopacea) and its hosts

It is found that koel eggs were highly non-mimetic to those of common myna and long-tailed shrike, but showed good mimicry to house crow eggs, while cuckoo eggs showed excellent egg mimicry with the eggs of their black drongo hosts, as did common hawk cuckoos and piedcuckoos with their jungle babbler host.

Host use by four sympatric species of cuckoos in Bangladesh

It is found that koel eggs were highly non-mimetic to those of common myna and long-tailed shrike, but showed good mimicry to house crow eggs, while cuckoo eggs showed excellent egg mimicry with the eggs of their black drongo hosts, as did common hawk cuckoos and piedcuckoos with their jungle babbler host.

Comparative nesting patterns and success of Mynas and Starlings (Aves: Sturnidae) inhabiting Jahangirnagar University campus, Bangladesh

Nesting patterns of four species of mynas and starlings, Common Myna (Acridotheres tristis), Jungle Myna (Acridotheres fuscus), the Asian-pied Starling (Gracupica contra) and Chestnut-tailed Mtarling

Responses of potential hosts of Asian cuckoos to experimental parasitism

Experimental parasitized nests of 10 potential host species breeding in sympatry with four different cuckoo species in an area in Bangladesh using differently coloured model eggs to test host responses, showing considerable variation in egg rejection rates among various species.

Brood parasitic cuckoos and their hosts in Jahangirnagar University campus

The nest’s height above ground was an important predictor of brood parasitism in Long-tailed Shrike with an increased risk of brood Parasitism in low nests and all the host species suffered the costs of brood parasites, showing reduced breeding success.

Avian brood parasitism by Common hawk cuckoo (Hierococcyx varius) and Jacobin cuckoo (Clamator jacobinus) in Bangladesh

The Jungle babbler (Turdoides striata) has been mentioned as host of the Common hawk cuckoo (Hierococcyx varius), one of the most widely distributed cuckoos also known as ‘brain fever bird’ in the Indian sub-continent.

First record of Common Tailorbird (Orthotomus sutorius) parasitism by Plaintive Cuckoo (Cacomantis merulinus) in Bangladesh

It is found that the Common Tailorbird was the only potential host used by Plaintive Cuckoos, and parasitism rate was rather high, but both host and cuckoo breeding success was poor, due to frequent nest predation.

Diversity of parasitic cuckoos and their hosts in China

The first review of host use by brood parasitic cuckoos in a multiple-cuckoo system in China is provided, based on its own long-term field data and a compilation of observations obtained from the literature.

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It is found that koel eggs were highly non-mimetic to those of common myna and long-tailed shrike, but showed good mimicry to house crow eggs, while cuckoo eggs showed excellent egg mimicry with the eggs of their black drongo hosts, as did common hawk cuckoos and piedcuckoos with their jungle babbler host.

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