Factors driving extreme sexual size dimorphism of a sit-and-wait predator under low density

@article{Legrand2000FactorsDE,
  title={Factors driving extreme sexual size dimorphism of a sit-and-wait predator under low density},
  author={Rebecca S. Legrand and Douglass H. Morse},
  journal={Biological Journal of The Linnean Society},
  year={2000},
  volume={71},
  pages={643-664}
}
Sexual size dimorphism is often a likely outcome of the interplay between natural selection and sexual selection, with female size dictated primarily by natural selection that maximizes fecundity and male size by sexual selection that maximizes reproductive opportunities. Attention to male fitness has focused heavily on direct male–male conflict selecting for superior male size and/or fighting ability, although male reproductive traits vary immensely among animals. An alternative, advanced by… 
Absence of Mate Choice and Postcopulatory Benefits in a Species with Extreme Sexual Size Dimorphism
TLDR
Testing the hypotheses that larger size in females and smaller size in males are sexually selected through differential pre- and postcopulatory reproductive benefits in M. celer found no support for any of the predictions, suggesting that SSD in Mecaphesa celer may not be driven by pre- or post-reproductive fitness benefits to small males.
Competing dwarf males: sexual selection in an orb‐weaving spider
TLDR
It is shown that, contrary to previous hypotheses, the local operational sex ratio is male‐biased most of the season in a species with ‘dwarf’ males, the orb‐weaving spider Argiope aurantia.
Sexual selection for increased male body size and protandry in a spider
Proximate and evolutionary causes of sexual size dimorphism in the crab spider Mecaphesa celer
TLDR
The hypothesis that larger size in females and smaller size in males are sexually selected through differential preand postcopulatory reproductive benefits is tested, suggesting that SSD in M. celer may not be driven by pre or post-reproductive fitness benefits to small males.
Field evidence challenges the often‐presumed relationship between early male maturation and female‐biased sexual size dimorphism
TLDR
The results challenge classic hypotheses linking protandry and female‐biased SSD, and emphasize the importance of directly testing the often‐assumed relationships between co‐occurring animal traits.
Movement, sex ratio, and population density in a dwarf male spider species, Misumenoides formosipes (Araneae: Thomisidae)
TLDR
While extreme SSD may be associated with enhanced mobility of small males during searches for females, it is not precluded by extensive male agonistic encounters.
Males under attack: sexual cannibalism and its consequences for male morphology and behaviour in an orb-weaving spider
TLDR
The results suggest that sexual cannibalism is not an important contributor to the maintenance of the sexual dimorphism in size or shape (relative leg length) in this species, however, sexual cannibalisms does select for very short copulation duration and rapid sperm transfer.
Selection on male size, leg length and condition during mate search in a sexually highly dimorphic orb-weaving spider
TLDR
Examination of selection on male body size and leg length during mate search in the highly dimorphic orb-weaving spider Argiope aurantia finds the hypothesis that relatively longer legs in male spiders reflect a search-adapted morphology is supported.
Male morphology, performance and female mate choice of a swarming insect
TLDR
Both morphological and performance traits contributed to male success, which acted through female choice, indicating a role for sexual selection in Alabagrus texanus.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 35 REFERENCES
Sexual dimorphism and distorted sex ratios in spiders
TLDR
This work presents a new model in which high mortality of searching mature males reduces the adult sex ratio (males: females), relaxing male–male competition and reducing the importance of male body size to favour dwarfing by early maturation provides a mechanism that buffers skews inAdult sex ratio.
Allometry for Sexual Size Dimorphism: Pattern and Process in the Coevolution of Body Size in Males and Females
Sexual size dimorphism (SSD) is common in both plants and animals, and current evidence suggests that it reflects the adaptation of males and females to their different reproductive roles. When
Sexual cannibalism, competition, and size dimorphism in the orb-weaving spider Nephila plumipes Latreille (Araneae: Araneoidea)
TLDR
This work investigated experimentally the effects of sexual cannibalism and male-male competition on male body size and hence sexual dimorphism in die Australian golden orb-weaver (Nephila plumipes).
SELECTION ON FECUNDITY AND VARIATION IN THE DEGREE OF SEXUAL SIZE DIMORPHISM AMONG SPIDER SPECIES (CLASS ARANEAE)
  • G. Head
  • Biology, Environmental Science
    Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 1995
TLDR
Spiders were chosen because they display great interspecific variation in the degree of sexual size dimorphism, yet the mechanisms producing size variation are simple and well understood, and there may be some fundamental differences between vertebrates and invertebrates in the forces selecting for sexual sizeDimorphism.
Female control : sexual selection by cryptic female choice
TLDR
Cryptic female choice establishes a new bridge between sexual selection theory and reproductive physiology, in particular the physiological effects of male seminal products on female reproductive processes, such as sperm transport, oviposition, and remating.
Mate Guarding and Aggression by the Crab Spider Misumena vatia in Relation to Female Reproductive Status and Sex Ratio
TLDR
It is suggested that sex ratio is more important than density in dictating precopulatory guarding and aggression in a low-density, female-biased population of the crab spider Misumena vatia.
Sex ratio variation in sheet-web spiders: options for female control?
TLDR
It is suggested that females in the wild have options, which are not used, to direct the primary sex ratio away from one-third males, which deviation from Fisherian sex ratio may be caused by selfish genetic elements and/or meiotic drive.
Female distribution affects mate searching and sexual selection in male northern water snakes (Nerodia sipedon)
TLDR
Overall, the distribution of females had a pronounced effect on male behavior, on the factors that affected male success in locating females, and probably on the extent of sperm competition once females had been located.
Scramble-Competition Polygyny in an Asocial Mammal: Male Mobility and Mating Success
TLDR
Polygynous mating systems in which the location of sexually receptive females constitutes a male's chief competitive hurdle have been predicted to place a selective premium on several male traits that differ markedly from those associated with intrasexual selection based predominantly on combat.
...
1
2
3
4
...