Factors associated with the development of peanut allergy in childhood.

@article{Lack2003FactorsAW,
  title={Factors associated with the development of peanut allergy in childhood.},
  author={G. Lack and Deborah Fox and K. Northstone and J. Golding},
  journal={The New England journal of medicine},
  year={2003},
  volume={348 11},
  pages={
          977-85
        }
}
BACKGROUND The prevalence of peanut allergy appears to have increased in recent decades. Other than a family history of peanut allergy and the presence of atopy, there are no known risk factors. METHODS We used data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, a geographically defined cohort study of 13,971 preschool children, to identify those with a convincing history of peanut allergy and the subgroup that reacted to a double-blind peanut challenge. We first prospectively… Expand

Paper Mentions

Observational Clinical Trial
The purpose of this study is to observe the natural course of food allergy, including both the development of peanut allergy in infants at high risk for developing this allergy, and… Expand
ConditionsEgg Hypersensitivity, Food Hypersensitivity, Milk Hypersensitivity, (+1 more)
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  • Allergy, asthma, and clinical immunology : official journal of the Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
  • 2011
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