Facilitation of the soleus stretch reflex induced by electrical excitation of plantar cutaneous afferents located around the heel

@article{Sayenko2007FacilitationOT,
  title={Facilitation of the soleus stretch reflex induced by electrical excitation of plantar cutaneous afferents located around the heel},
  author={Dimitry G. Sayenko and Albert H. Vette and Kiyotaka Kamibayashi and Tsuyoshi Nakajima and Masami Akai and Kimitaka Nakazawa},
  journal={Neuroscience Letters},
  year={2007},
  volume={415},
  pages={294-298}
}

Figures from this paper

Differential effects of plantar cutaneous afferent excitation on soleus stretch and H‐reflex
TLDR
The reported findings on the contribution of plantar cutaneous afferents within spinal interneuron reflex circuits as a function of their location and the reflex studied are extended.
Location‐specific cutaneous electrical stimulation of the footsole modulates corticospinal excitability to the plantarflexors and dorsiflexors during standing
TLDR
Evidence is provided that cutaneous reflexes from foot sole skin are likely influenced by a transcortical pathway, and that excitability from supraspinal sources likely decreased, which could be due to a net change in the excitability of intracortical circuits.
Limb Segment Load Inhibits the Recovery of Soleus H-Reflex After Segmental Vibration in Humans
TLDR
A combination of limb segment vibration and compression may offer a nonpharmacologic method to modulate spinal reflex excitability in people after CNS injury.
Frequency characteristics of lower limb muscle responses to proprioceptive perturbations evoked by Achilles tendon vibration during standing and the influence of age and stroke
TLDR
The purpose of this thesis was to characterize the short latency lower limb muscle responses to proprioceptive perturbations during standing, and examine how they are influenced by ageing and chronic stroke.
Biomechanical aspects of sensitivity in relationship with motor control
TLDR
The aim of the present thesis is to investigate the effects of reduced plantar sensitivity on quasi-static and dynamic balance control, as well as muscle reflexes in ageing, peripheral neuropathies, and other neurological disorders like Parkinson's disease.
Soleus responses to Achilles tendon stimuli are suppressed by heel and enhanced by metatarsal cutaneous stimuli during standing
TLDR
The spatially organized interaction between cutaneous feedback from the foot sole and the soleus vibration response provides information about how somatosensory information is combined to appropriately respond to perturbations during standing.
Reflex affecting of muscle tone by proprioreceptive input – theoretical starting points
TLDR
It is demonstrated that the muscle tone has its passive and active components and that one group cannot simultaneously include patients with CMP and transversal medullar lesion since in terms of neurophysiology, these are no identical pathological conditions.
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 35 REFERENCES
Withdrawal reflex organisation to electrical stimulation of the dorsal foot in humans
TLDR
Observations show that painful stimuli activate appropriate muscles depending on stimulus location to initiate the adequate withdrawal, which suggests a more refined withdrawal reflex organisation than a stereotyped flexion of all joints to avoid tissue damage.
Modulation of lower limb withdrawal reflexes during gait: a topographical study.
TLDR
The withdrawal reflex was modulated during the gait cycle and presented distinctive characteristics for the different muscles studied, especially during the swing phase where maximal flexion was obtained by stimulation at the arch of the foot.
Cutaneous control of group I pathways from ankle flexors to extensors in man
TLDR
Evidence is furnished that short-latency inhibition of soleus motoneurones after a single conditioning stimulation of group I afferents from the tibialis anterior muscle constitutes a true example of disynaptic Ia reciprocal inhibition in man.
Monosynaptic and oligosynaptic contributions to human ankle jerk and H-reflex.
TLDR
It is argued that if the rising phase of the increase in excitability of the soleus motoneuron pool produced by tendon percussion or by electrical stimulation of the peripheral nerve lasts more than a few milliseconds, these reflexes are unlikely to be exclusively monosynaptic.
Cutaneous depression of Ib reflex pathways to motoneurones in man
TLDR
It is suggested that during the stance phase of heel bipedal locomotion, the cutaneous depression of Ib reflex pathways to MNs supplying muscles operating at the knee might operate in association with the strong Ia connexions from ankle to knee muscles described in the previous paper.
Plantar cutaneous input modulates differently spinal reflexes in subjects with intact and injured spinal cord
TLDR
The effects of plantar cutaneous afferents change following a lesion to the spinal cord leading to exaggerated activity in both flexors and extensors, which suggests impaired modulation of the spinal inhibitory mechanisms involved in the reflex modulation.
Modulation of cutaneous reflexes by load receptor input during human walking
TLDR
It is proposed that load receptors are involved in the regulation of cutaneous reflex responses in order to adapt the locomotor pattern to the environmental conditions.
Effects of flexor reflex afferent stimulation on the soleus H reflex in patients with a complete spinal cord lesion: evidence for presynaptic inhibition of Ia transmission
TLDR
The effects of electrically stimulating the Flexor Reflex Afferent (FRA) on the soleus H reflexes were investigated in 34 paraplegic patients, consistent with the hypothesis that the reflex organization in patients with a spinal cord section is similar to that of the acute spinal cat injected with DOPA.
Reflex responses in active muscles elicited by stimulation of low-threshold afferents from the human foot.
TLDR
It is concluded that afferents from mechanoreceptors in the sole of the foot have multisynaptic reflex connections with the motoneuron pools innervating the muscles that act at the ankle.
...
...