Facilitating a benign interpretation bias in a high socially anxious population.

@article{Murphy2007FacilitatingAB,
  title={Facilitating a benign interpretation bias in a high socially anxious population.},
  author={Rebecca Murphy and Colette R. Hirsch and Andrew M Mathews and Keren Smith and David M Clark},
  journal={Behaviour research and therapy},
  year={2007},
  volume={45 7},
  pages={1517-29}
}
Previous research has shown that high socially anxious individuals lack the benign interpretation bias present in people without social anxiety. The tendency of high socially anxious people to generate more negative interpretations may lead to anticipated anxiety about future social situations. If so, developing a more benign interpretation bias could lead to a reduction in this anxiety. The current study showed that a benign interpretation bias could be facilitated (or 'trained') in a high… CONTINUE READING

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