Face identity recognition in autism spectrum disorders: A review of behavioral studies

@article{Weigelt2012FaceIR,
  title={Face identity recognition in autism spectrum disorders: A review of behavioral studies},
  author={Sarah Weigelt and Kami Koldewyn and Nancy G Kanwisher},
  journal={Neuroscience \& Biobehavioral Reviews},
  year={2012},
  volume={36},
  pages={1060-1084}
}
Face recognition--the ability to recognize a person from their facial appearance--is essential for normal social interaction. Face recognition deficits have been implicated in the most common disorder of social interaction: autism. Here we ask: is face identity recognition in fact impaired in people with autism? Reviewing behavioral studies we find no strong evidence for a qualitative difference in how facial identity is processed between those with and without autism: markers of typical face… 
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