• Corpus ID: 73588956

FORTUYNIA ATLANTICA SP . NOV . , A THALASSOBIONTIC ORIBATID MITE FROM THE ROCKY COAST OF THE BERMUDA ISLANDS ( ACARI : ORIBATIDA : FORTUYNIIDAE )

@inproceedings{Alberti2008FORTUYNIAAS,
  title={FORTUYNIA ATLANTICA SP . NOV . , A THALASSOBIONTIC ORIBATID MITE FROM THE ROCKY COAST OF THE BERMUDA ISLANDS ( ACARI : ORIBATIDA : FORTUYNIIDAE )},
  author={Gerd Alberti},
  year={2008}
}
— The gnathosoma is considered by most authors as the main constitutive character of a monophylum Acari. However, this has been questioned due to fundamental differences regarding its morphology in Anactinotrichida (=Parasitiformes s.l.) and Actinotrichida (=Acariformes). A key character which might indicate homology is represented by stout cuticular structures called corniculi, rutella, and/or pseudorutella present in most of the main groups of mites. However, the homology of these structures… 
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