FORMALISING ARISTOCRATIC POWER IN ROYAL ACTA IN LATE TWELFTH- AND EARLY THIRTEENTH-CENTURY FRANCE AND SCOTLAND

@article{Taylor2018FORMALISINGAP,
  title={FORMALISING ARISTOCRATIC POWER IN ROYAL ACTA IN LATE TWELFTH- AND EARLY THIRTEENTH-CENTURY FRANCE AND SCOTLAND},
  author={Alice Taylor},
  journal={Transactions of the Royal Historical Society},
  year={2018},
  volume={28},
  pages={33 - 64}
}
  • Alice Taylor
  • Published 1 September 2018
  • History, Economics
  • Transactions of the Royal Historical Society
ABSTRACT Our understanding of the development of secular institutional governments in Europe during the central Middle Ages has long been shaped by an implicit or explicit opposition between royal and lay aristocratic power. That is to say, the growth of public, institutional and/or bureaucratic central authorities involved the decline and/or exclusion of noble aristocratic power, which thus necessarily operated in a zero-sum game. While much research has shown that this conflict-driven… 
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