• Corpus ID: 24847396

FLOW (finding lasting options for women): multicentre randomized controlled trial comparing tampons with menstrual cups.

@article{Howard2011FLOWL,
  title={FLOW (finding lasting options for women): multicentre randomized controlled trial comparing tampons with menstrual cups.},
  author={Courtney Howard and Caren Lee Rose and Konia Trouton and Holly Stamm and Daniel Marentette and Nicole Kirkpatrick and Sanja Karalić and Renee Fernandez and Julie Paget},
  journal={Canadian family physician Medecin de famille canadien},
  year={2011},
  volume={57 6},
  pages={
          e208-15
        }
}
OBJECTIVE To determine whether menstrual cups are a viable alternative to tampons. DESIGN Randomized controlled trial. SETTING Prince George, Victoria, and Vancouver, BC. PARTICIPANTS A total of 110 women aged 19 to 40 years who had previously used tampons as their main method of menstrual management. INTERVENTION Participants were randomized into 2 groups, a tampon group and a menstrual cup group. Using online diaries, participants tracked 1 menstrual cycle using their regular method… 
Acceptability and performance of the menstrual cup in South Africa: a randomized crossover trial comparing the menstrual cup to tampons or sanitary pads.
TLDR
MC acceptance in a population of novice users, many with limited experience with tampons, indicates that there is a pool of potential users in low-resource settings.
Acceptability and safety of the menstrual cups among Iranian women: a cross-sectional study
TLDR
The high level of acceptability and safety of the menstrual cup showed that this product is a suitable alternative for menstrual management in Iranian women.
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TLDR
No evidence emerged to indicate menstrual cups are hazardous or cause health harms among rural Kenyan schoolgirls, but large-scale trials and post-marketing surveillance should continue to evaluate cup safety.
Use of menstrual cups among school girls: longitudinal observations nested in a randomised controlled feasibility study in rural western Kenya
TLDR
Objective evidence through cup colour change suggests school girls in rural Africa can use menstrual cups, with uptake improving with peer group education and over time.
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TLDR
This work recommends firmness categories, ranging from ‘very soft’ to ‘ very firm’ as a first step, to help women make an informed decision to choose the correct menstrual cup and minimize injury.
Menstrual cup use, leakage, acceptability, safety, and availability: a systematic review and meta-analysis
TLDR
It is indicated that menstrual cups are a safe option for menstruation management and are being used internationally and further studies are needed on cost-effectiveness and environmental effect comparing different menstrual products.
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TLDR
The use of vaginal menstrual cups for menstrual hygiene management among schoolgirls in Thokarpa, Sindupalchowk, Nepal appears feasible and acceptable, as it involves practical, economic and environmental advantages, however, the scale-up of menstrual cups will require resolving described concerns and discomforts and fostering peer and family support.
[Acceptability and safety of the menstrual cup: A systematic review of the literature].
TLDR
The menstrual cup appears to be a comfortable, safe and efficient option for menstrual hygiene and further randomized controlled studies and long-term prospective cohort studies are needed in order to determine the risk of complications due to excess bacterial colonization or retrograde menstruation.
Safety and efficacy of the NuvaRing® Applicator in healthy females: a multicenter, open-label, randomized, 2-period crossover study.
TLDR
The NuvaRing Applicator is effective and well-tolerated (NCT02275546), and there was no vaginal bleeding within 15 h post-applicator use.
Comparing use and acceptability of menstrual cups and sanitary pads by schoolgirls in rural Western Kenya
TLDR
While a smaller proportion of girls provided with cups used them in the first months compared to girls given pads, reported use was similar by study-end, and early acceptability issues reduced over time.
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