FIRST ASCERTAINED AFRICAN “CONDYLARTH” MAMMALS (PRIMITIVE UNGULATES: cf. BULBULODENTATA AND cf. PHENACODONTA) FROM THE EARLIEST YPRESIAN OF THE OULED ABDOUN BASIN, MOROCCO

@inproceedings{Gheerbrant2001FIRSTAA,
  title={FIRST ASCERTAINED AFRICAN “CONDYLARTH” MAMMALS (PRIMITIVE UNGULATES: cf. BULBULODENTATA AND cf. PHENACODONTA) FROM THE EARLIEST YPRESIAN OF THE OULED ABDOUN BASIN, MOROCCO},
  author={Emmanuel Gheerbrant and Jean Sudre and Mohamed Iarochene and Abdelkader Moumni},
  year={2001}
}
Abstract We report here the discovery of the first well identified “condylarths” from Africa, from the phosphatic beds of Ouled Abdoun Basin, Morocco, of probable early Ypresian age, which have also yielded the oldest known proboscidean. Abdounodus hamdii n. gen., n. sp. and Ocepeia daouiensis, gen. et sp. nov., show closest relationships with Mioclaenidae and Phenacodonta respectively. Both taxa also have resemblances with South American primitive ungulates, especially Abdounodus which… 

Ocepeia (Middle Paleocene of Morocco): The Oldest Skull of an Afrotherian Mammal

The remarkable character mosaic of Ocepeia makes it the first known “transitional fossil” between insectivore-like and ungulate-like afrotherians and the autapomorphic family Ocepeiidae supports the old – earliest Tertiary or Cretaceous – endemic evolution of placentals in Africa.

A new large mammal from the Ypresian of Morocco: evidence of surprising diversity of early proboscideans

A parsimony analysis of Daouitherium suggests its intermediate phylogenetic position between the basal, small Phosphatherium and the large, more derived Numidotherium and Barytherium, and this supports the African origin of Proboscidea s.s. koholense.

Further evidence of the African antiquity of hyaenodontid (‘Creodonta’, Mammalia) evolution

The discovery of Lahimia provides direct evidence for the antiquity of the African evolution of the Hyaenodontidae and the Koholiinae, which is representative of an old African endemic lineage, as initially recognized, is characterized by synapomorphies of LahIMia and Boualitomus, and also by a shared original prevallum/postvallid shearing.

Convergence of Afrotherian and Laurasiatherian Ungulate-Like Mammals: First Morphological Evidence from the Paleocene of Morocco

New critical fossils of one of the few known African condylarth-like mammal, the enigmatic Abdounodus from the middle Paleocene of Morocco, help to identify the first convincing synapomorphy within the Afrotheria–i.e., the pseudohypocone–that demonstrates the morphological convergence of African and Laurasian ungulate-like placentals, in agreement with molecular phylogeny.

New remains and species of the ‘condylarth’ genus Escribania (Mammalia: Didolodontidae) from the Palaeocene of Patagonia, Argentina

The derived nature of the didolodontid ‘condylarths’ from the Banco Negro Inferior, their differences with the Mioclaenidae Kollpaniinae from the early Paleocene of Tiupampa, and the record of bona fide litoptherns in theBanco Negro inferior (BNI) suggest an early radiation of the panameriungulates.

First Skull of Orthaspidotherium edwardsi (Mammalia, “Condylarthra”) from the Late Paleocene of Berru (France) and Phylogenetic Affinities of the Enigmatic European Family Pleuraspidotheriidae

A mosaic of plesiomorphic and derived characters that distinguish Pleuraspidotheriidae from all other ‘ungulates’ are highlighted, and primitive arctocyonids could represent a possible ancestral morphotype for pleuraspIDotheriids.

A New Didolodontid Mammal from the Late Paleocene—Earliest Eocene of Laguna Umayo, Peru

A previously undescribed tooth from the Muñani Formation at the Laguna Umayo locality, Peru, represents the new didolodontid Umayodus raimondi gen. et sp. nov., here diagnosed by the presence of a

BOMBURIA AND ELLIPSODON (MAMMALIA: MIOCLAENIDAE) FROM THE EARLY PALEOCENE OF NEW MEXICO

Bomburia is a valid genus, whereas Platymastus palantir, previously considered to be a loxolophine arctocyonid, is probably a junior synonym of B. prisca and as such reveals the upper molar morphology of this taxon.

An enigmatic new ungulate‐like mammal from the early Eocene of India

A new genus and species of herbivorous mammal, Pahelia mysteriosa, from the early Eocene Cambay Shale Formation, Tadkeshwar Lignite Mine, Gujarat, India, is reported, with some similarities to a diversity of ungulates from Africa, Asia, Europe and North America.

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