FIELD USE OF MAXIMAL SPRINT SPEED BY COLLARED LIZARDS (CROTAPHYTUS COLLARIS): COMPENSATION AND SEXUAL SELECTION

@article{Husak2006FIELDUO,
  title={FIELD USE OF MAXIMAL SPRINT SPEED BY COLLARED LIZARDS (CROTAPHYTUS COLLARIS): COMPENSATION AND SEXUAL SELECTION},
  author={J. Husak and S. Fox},
  journal={Evolution},
  year={2006},
  volume={60}
}
Abstract To understand how selection acts on performance capacity, the ecological role of the performance trait being measured must be determined. Knowing if and when an animal uses maximal performance capacity may give insight into what specific selective pressures may be acting on performance, because individuals are expected to use close to maximal capacity only in contexts important to survival or reproductive success. Furthermore, if an ecological context is important, poor performers are… Expand

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