FFA: a flexible fusiform area for subordinate-level visual processing automatized by expertise

@article{Tarr2000FFAAF,
  title={FFA: a flexible fusiform area for subordinate-level visual processing automatized by expertise},
  author={Michael J. Tarr and Isabel Gauthier},
  journal={Nature Neuroscience},
  year={2000},
  volume={3},
  pages={764-769}
}
Much evidence suggests that the fusiform face area is involved in face processing. In contrast to the accompanying article by Kanwisher, we conclude that the apparent face selectivity of this area reflects a more generalized form of processing not intrinsically specific to faces. 
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Through brain imaging studies and studies of brain-lesioned patients with face or object recognition deflcits, the fusiform face area (FFA) has been identifled as a face-speciflc processing area.
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It is argued that the interplay between the unique demands of word reading and the structural constraints of the visual system lead to the emergence of the Visual Word Form Area.
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