FERTILITY CHANGES IN CENTRAL ASIA SINCE 1980

@article{Spoorenberg2013FERTILITYCI,
  title={FERTILITY CHANGES IN CENTRAL ASIA SINCE 1980},
  author={Thomas Spoorenberg},
  journal={Asian Population Studies},
  year={2013},
  volume={9},
  pages={50 - 77}
}
Limited studies document the fertility changes in Central Asia. Using survey and official data, this study describes the fertility changes since 1980 in Kazakhstan, the Kyrgyz Republic, and Uzbekistan. I first consider the swift decline in fertility in the 1980s and 1990s through the analysis of Synthetic Parity Progression Ratios (SPPRs). SPPRs show that women still have at least one child despite economic difficulties and that the end of communism affected more the transition to higher-order… 
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