FEMALE MATE PREFERENCE AND REPRODUCTIVE ISOLATION IN POPULATIONS OF THE STRIPED MOUSE RHABDOMYS PUMILIO

@article{Pillay2000FEMALEMP,
  title={FEMALE MATE PREFERENCE AND REPRODUCTIVE ISOLATION IN POPULATIONS OF THE STRIPED MOUSE RHABDOMYS PUMILIO},
  author={N. Pillay},
  journal={Behaviour},
  year={2000},
  volume={137},
  pages={1431-1441}
}
Laboratory experiments were conducted to study female mate preference in three allopatric populations of the striped mouse Rhabdomys pumilio , an African murid rodent. The three populations (Alice, Goegap, Irene) represent the extremes of the distribution range of the species in South Africa. Using two-way choice tests, virgin females were exposed to: (i) males of the same population (homotype) and those of another population (heterotype) in whole animal choice tests, or (ii) the odiferous… Expand
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