FASTER LIZARDS SIRE MORE OFFSPRING: SEXUAL SELECTION ON WHOLE‐ANIMAL PERFORMANCE

@article{Husak2006FASTERLS,
  title={FASTER LIZARDS SIRE MORE OFFSPRING: SEXUAL SELECTION ON WHOLE‐ANIMAL PERFORMANCE},
  author={J. Husak and S. Fox and M. Lovern and R. Bussche},
  journal={Evolution},
  year={2006},
  volume={60}
}
Abstract Sexual selection operates by acting on variation in mating success. However, since selection acts on whole‐organism manifestations (i.e., performance) of underlying morphological traits, tests for phenotypic effects of sexual selection should consider whole‐animal performance as a substrate for sexual selection. Previous studies have revealed positive relationships between performance and survival, that is, natural selection, but none have explicitly tested whether performance may… Expand
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