FACE BITING ON A JUVENILE TYRANNOSAURID AND BEHAVIORAL IMPLICATIONS

@inproceedings{Peterson2009FACEBO,
  title={FACE BITING ON A JUVENILE TYRANNOSAURID AND BEHAVIORAL IMPLICATIONS},
  author={Joseph E. Peterson and Michael D. Henderson and Reed P. Scherer and Christopher P. Vittore},
  year={2009}
}
Abstract The juvenile tyrannosaurid specimen BMR P2002.4.1 possesses a series of four partially healed, oblong lesions along the left maxilla and nasal bones. The morphology of the lesions and their positioning and orientation are compatible with the jaws of the specimen, suggesting that the lesions may have been the result of a bite from an attacker of similar size and species as the bite victim. Bone remodeling of the lesions indicates partial healing and demonstrates that the injury was not… 
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