Eyes on target: what neurons must do for the vestibuloocular reflex during linear motion.

@article{Angelaki2004EyesOT,
  title={Eyes on target: what neurons must do for the vestibuloocular reflex during linear motion.},
  author={Dora E. Angelaki},
  journal={Journal of neurophysiology},
  year={2004},
  volume={92 1},
  pages={
          20-35
        }
}
  • D. Angelaki
  • Published 1 July 2004
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Journal of neurophysiology
A gaze-stabilization reflex that has been conserved throughout evolution is the rotational vestibuloocular reflex (RVOR), which keeps images stable on the entire retina during head rotation. An ethological newer reflex, the translational or linear VOR (TVOR), provides fast foveal image stabilization during linear motion. Whereas the sensorimotor processing has been extensively studied in the RVOR, much less is currently known about the neural organization of the TVOR. Here we summarize the… 
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TLDR
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TLDR
The results suggest that neural activities during the TVOR were more motorlike compared with cell responses during the rotational vestibuloocular reflex (RVOR), and that neural responses under stable gaze conditions could not always be predicted by a linear vectorial addition of the cell activities during pursuit and VOR cancellation.
The Human Vertical Translational Vestibulo‐ocular Reflex
TLDR
It is postulate that tVOR evolved not to stabilize the image of the target on the fovea, but rather to minimize retinal image motion between objects lying in different depth planes, in order to optimize motion parallax information.
Otolith inputs to pursuit neurons in the frontal eye fields of alert monkeys
TLDR
Discharge modulation of FEF pursuit neurons during whole body translation reflected otolith inputs, indicating that the smooth-pursuit system must interact with the vestibular system to maintain the accuracy of eye movements in space during head movement.
Vestibulo-ocular responses to vertical translation in normal human subjects
TLDR
It is postulate that tVOR evolved not to stabilize the image of the target on the fovea, but rather to minimize retinal image motion between objects lying in different planes, in order to optimize motion parallax information.
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