Eye movements of laterally eyed birds are not independent

@article{Voss2009EyeMO,
  title={Eye movements of laterally eyed birds are not independent},
  author={Joe Voss and H. -J. Bischof},
  journal={Journal of Experimental Biology},
  year={2009},
  volume={212},
  pages={1568 - 1575}
}
  • J. Voss, H. Bischof
  • Published 15 May 2009
  • Biology, Psychology
  • Journal of Experimental Biology
SUMMARY Most birds have laterally placed eyes with two largely separated visual fields. According to studies in pigeons laterally eyed birds move their eyes independently in most situations, eye coordination just occurred during converging saccades towards frontal stimuli. Here we demonstrate for the first time that laterally eyed zebra finches show coordinated eye movements, regarding direction and amplitude. Spontaneous and visually elicited movements of the two eyes were recorded… 

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