Eye Shape and Retinal Topography in Owls (Aves: Strigiformes)

@article{Lisney2012EyeSA,
  title={Eye Shape and Retinal Topography in Owls (Aves: Strigiformes)},
  author={Thomas J. Lisney and Andrew N. Iwaniuk and Mischa V Bandet and Douglas R. Wylie},
  journal={Brain, Behavior and Evolution},
  year={2012},
  volume={79},
  pages={218 - 236}
}
The eyes of vertebrates show adaptations to the visual environments in which they evolve. [] Key Method Here, we examined interspecific variation in eye shape and retinal topography in nine species of owl. Eye shape (the ratio of corneal diameter to eye axial length) differed among species, with nocturnal species having relatively larger corneal diameters than diurnal species. All the owl species have an area of high retinal ganglion cell (RGC) density in the temporal retina and a visual streak of increased…

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