Extremely conserved histone H4 N terminus is dispensable for growth but essential for repressing the silent mating loci in yeast

@article{Kayne1988ExtremelyCH,
  title={Extremely conserved histone H4 N terminus is dispensable for growth but essential for repressing the silent mating loci in yeast},
  author={Paul S. Kayne and Ung Jin Kim and Min Han and J R Mullen and Fuminori Yoshizaki and Michael Grunstein},
  journal={Cell},
  year={1988},
  volume={55},
  pages={27-39}
}
The highly conserved N-terminal domains of histones H3 and H4 are required for normal cell cycle progression
TLDR
The phenotypes of cells subject to this synthetic lethality suggest that the N-terminal domains are required for functions essential throughout the cell division cycle and provide genetic evidence that histones are randomly distributed during chromosome replication.
Positive Charge of Arginine Residues on Histone H4 Tail Is Required for Maintenance of Mating Type in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.
TLDR
The data implicated that the positive charge of two arginine residues on the histone H4 tail is required for HM silencing in a manner independent of Dot1, and suggested that the basic property of arginines at 17th and 19th positions in the hist one H4 Tail is critical for maintaining HM silences, but that of the 23rd arginin is not.
Histone H3 amino terminus is required for telomeric and silent mating locus repression in yeast
TLDR
It is reported that histone H3 is required for full repression at yeast telomeres and at partially disabled silent mating loci, and that the acetylatable lysine residues of H3 play an important role in silencing.
Redundant Roles for Histone H3 N-Terminal Lysine Residues in Subtelomeric Gene Repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae
TLDR
It is proposed that acetylation and methylation of histone H3 N-terminal lysine residues act as redundant mechanisms to demarcate regions of euchromatin from heterochromatin.
Genome-Wide Analysis of the Relationship between Transcriptional Regulation by Rpd3p and the Histone H3 and H4 Amino Termini in Budding Yeast
TLDR
It is suggested that acetylation of either the H3 or the H4 amino terminus could suffice to allow the activation of such genes, and the relationship between H3 tails and H4 tails in global gene expression is examined to find substantial overlap among the gene sets regulated by these histone tails.
Yeast histone H3 and H4 amino termini are important for nucleosome assembly in vivo and in vitro: redundant and position-independent functions in assembly but not in gene regulation.
TLDR
It is found that the histone amino termini are important for nucleosome assembly in vivo and in vitro, and the regulation of GAL1 and the silent mating loci by the H3 and H4 tails is highly disrupted by exchange of the hist one aminotermini.
Yeast Chromatin Assembly Complex 1 Protein Excludes Nonacetylatable Forms of Histone H4 from Chromatin and the Nucleus
TLDR
It is concluded that N-terminal lysines of histone H4 are important for efficient histone nuclear import and support a model whereby Cac1p and Kap123 cooperate to ensure that only appropriately acetylated hist one H4 proteins are imported into the nucleus.
A new class of histone H2A mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae causes specific transcriptional defects in vivo
TLDR
A new class of mutations in the histone H2A-encoding gene HTA1 that causes transcriptional defects at the SNF/SWI-dependent gene SUC2 is identified that may identify an additional step that is required to overcome repression by chromatin.
A core nucleosome surface crucial for transcriptional silencing
TLDR
It is shown that a specific surface of the assembled nucleosome core is required for silencing in yeast, and mutations in the genes encoding H3 and H4 mapping to spatially adjacent amino-acid residues affected the three forms of silencing distinctly, suggesting that specific interactions mediate each form ofsilencing.
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A yeast strain is constructed in which the sole histone H4 gene is under control of the GAL1 promoter and it was found that the resultant lethality manifests itself first in S phase, the period of nucleosome assembly, but leads to highly synchronous arrest in G2 and a virtually complete block in chromosomal segregation.
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Cell undergoing nucleosome depletion synthesized large quantities of accurate PHO5 transcripts even under repressive, high inorganic phosphate conditions, suggesting that nucleosomes regulatePHO5 transcription.
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