Extreme reversed sexual size dimorphism in the extinct New Zealand moa Dinornis

@article{Bunce2003ExtremeRS,
  title={Extreme reversed sexual size dimorphism in the extinct New Zealand moa Dinornis},
  author={Michael Bunce and Trevor H. Worthy and Tom Ford and William J. E. Hoppitt and Eske Willerslev and Alexei J. Drummond and Alan Cooper},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2003},
  volume={425},
  pages={172-175}
}
The ratite moa (Aves; Dinornithiformes) were massive graviportal browsers weighing up to 250 kg (ref. 1) that dominated the New Zealand biota until their extinction approximately 500 yr ago. Despite an extensive Quaternary fossil record, moa taxonomy remains problematic and currently 11 species are recognized. Three Dinornis species were found throughout New Zealand and differed markedly in size (1–2 m height at back) and mass (from ∼34 to 242 kg). Surprisingly, ancient mitochondrial DNA… Expand
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