Extreme melt on Canada's Arctic ice caps in the 21st century

@article{Sharp2011ExtremeMO,
  title={Extreme melt on Canada's Arctic ice caps in the 21st century},
  author={Martin J. Sharp and David O. Burgess and J. Graham Cogley and M. A. Ecclestone and Claude Labine and Gabriel Wolken},
  journal={Geophysical Research Letters},
  year={2011},
  volume={38}
}
[1] Canada's Queen Elizabeth Islands contain ∼14% of Earth's glacier and ice cap area. Snow accumulation on these glaciers is low and varies little from year to year. Changes in their surface mass balance are driven largely by changes in summer air temperatures, surface melting and runoff. Relative to 2000–2004, strong summer warming since 2005 (1.1 to 1.6°C at 700 hPa) has increased summer mean ice surface temperatures and melt season length on the major ice caps in this region by 0.8 to 2.2°C… Expand

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