Extreme longevity in a deep-sea vestimentiferan tubeworm and its implications for the evolution of life history strategies

@article{Durkin2017ExtremeLI,
  title={Extreme longevity in a deep-sea vestimentiferan tubeworm and its implications for the evolution of life history strategies},
  author={Alanna Durkin and C. Fisher and E. Cordes},
  journal={The Science of Nature},
  year={2017},
  volume={104},
  pages={1-7}
}
  • Alanna Durkin, C. Fisher, E. Cordes
  • Published 2017
  • Biology, Medicine
  • The Science of Nature
  • The deep sea is home to many species that have longer life spans than their shallow-water counterparts. This trend is primarily related to the decline in metabolic rates with temperature as depth increases. However, at bathyal depths, the cold-seep vestimentiferan tubeworm species Lamellibrachia luymesi and Seepiophila jonesi reach extremely old ages beyond what is predicted by the simple scaling of life span with body size and temperature. Here, we use individual-based models based on in situ… CONTINUE READING
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