Extreme Sexual Brain Size Dimorphism in Sticklebacks: A Consequence of the Cognitive Challenges of Sex and Parenting?

@inproceedings{Kotrschal2012ExtremeSB,
  title={Extreme Sexual Brain Size Dimorphism in Sticklebacks: A Consequence of the Cognitive Challenges of Sex and Parenting?},
  author={Alexander Kotrschal and Katja R{\"a}s{\"a}nen and Bjarni K Kristj{\'a}nsson and Mike Senn and Niclas Kolm},
  booktitle={PloS one},
  year={2012}
}
Selection pressures that act differently on males and females produce numerous differences between the sexes in morphology and behaviour. However, apart from the controversial report that males have slightly heavier brains than females in humans, evidence for substantial sexual dimorphism in brain size is scarce. This apparent sexual uniformity is surprising given that sexually distinct selection pressures are ubiquitous and that brains are one of the most plastic vertebrate organs. Here we… CONTINUE READING