Extraordinary Biomass-Burning Episode and Impact Winter Triggered by the Younger Dryas Cosmic Impact ∼12,800 Years Ago. 2. Lake, Marine, and Terrestrial Sediments

@article{Wolbach2018ExtraordinaryBE,
  title={Extraordinary Biomass-Burning Episode and Impact Winter Triggered by the Younger Dryas Cosmic Impact ∼12,800 Years Ago. 2. Lake, Marine, and Terrestrial Sediments},
  author={Wendy S Wolbach and Joanne P. Ballard and Paul Andrew Mayewski and Andrew C. Parnell and Niamh Cahill and Victor Adedeji and Theodore E. Bunch and Gabriela Dom{\'i}nguez-V{\'a}zquez and Jon M. Erlandson and R. B. Firestone and Timothy A. French and George A. Howard and Isabel Israde-Alc{\'a}ntara and John R. Johnson and David R. Kimbel and Charles R. Kinzie and Andrei V. Kurbatov and Gunther Kletetschka and Malcolm LeCompte and William C. Mahaney and Adrian L. Melott and Siddhartha Mitra and Abigail Maiorana-Boutilier and Christopher R. Moore and William M. Napier and Jennifer Parlier and Kenneth Barnett Tankersley and Brian C. Thomas and James H. Wittke and Allen West and James P. Kennett},
  journal={The Journal of Geology},
  year={2018},
  volume={126},
  pages={185 - 205}
}
Part 1 of this study investigated evidence of biomass burning in global ice records, and here we continue to test the hypothesis that an impact event at the Younger Dryas boundary (YDB) caused an anomalously intense episode of biomass burning at ∼12.8 ka on a multicontinental scale (North and South America, Europe, and Asia). Quantitative analyses of charcoal and soot records from 152 lakes, marine cores, and terrestrial sequences reveal a major peak in biomass burning at the Younger Dryas (YD… 

Extraordinary Biomass-Burning Episode and Impact Winter Triggered by the Younger Dryas Cosmic Impact ∼12,800 Years Ago. 1. Ice Cores and Glaciers

The Younger Dryas boundary (YDB) cosmic-impact hypothesis is based on considerable evidence that Earth collided with fragments of a disintegrating ≥100-km-diameter comet, the remnants of which

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The Younger Dryas (YD) climate episode (∼12,850–11,650 calendar years before present [cal BP]) is an event recorded widely across the Northern Hemisphere. We conducted multiple analyses at high

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Abundance and δ13C of sedimentary black carbon indicate rising wildfire and C4 plants in Northeast China during the early Holocene

Evidence from Pilauco, Chile Suggests a Catastrophic Cosmic Impact Occurred Near the Site ∼12,800 Years Ago

The Younger Dryas (YD) impact hypothesis proposes that fragments of a large, disintegrating asteroid/comet struck the Earth ∼12,800 years ago. This event simultaneously deposited high concentrations

12,800 years ago, Hellas and the World on Fire and Flood

The controversial large cosmic impact hypothesis (~12,800 years BP) over the Northern Hemisphere explains not only wildfires everywhere but also the rapid cooling of the Younger Dryas by

Evaluating the link between the sulfur-rich Laacher See volcanic eruption and the Younger Dryas climate anomaly

Abstract. The Younger Dryas is considered the archetypal millennial-scale climate change event, and identifying its cause is fundamental for thoroughly understanding climate systematics during
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Extraordinary Biomass-Burning Episode and Impact Winter Triggered by the Younger Dryas Cosmic Impact ∼12,800 Years Ago. 1. Ice Cores and Glaciers

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