Extragalactic Radio Sources and the WMAP Cold Spot

@article{Rudnick2007ExtragalacticRS,
  title={Extragalactic Radio Sources and the WMAP Cold Spot},
  author={Lawrence Rudnick and Shea Brown and Liliya L. R. Williams},
  journal={The Astrophysical Journal},
  year={2007},
  volume={671},
  pages={40 - 44}
}
We detect a dip of 20%-45% in the surface brightness and number counts of NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) sources smoothed to a few degrees at the location of the WMAP cold spot. The dip has structure on scales of ~1° to 10°. Together with independent all-sky wavelet analyses, our results suggest that the dip in extragalactic brightness and number counts and the WMAP cold spot are physically related, i.e., that the coincidence is neither a statistical anomaly nor a WMAP foreground-correction problem… 

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