Extra-pair paternity and tail ornamentation in the barn swallow Hirundo rustica

@article{Mller1997ExtrapairPA,
  title={Extra-pair paternity and tail ornamentation in the barn swallow Hirundo rustica},
  author={Anders Pape M{\o}ller and H{\aa}kan Tegelstr{\"o}m},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={1997},
  volume={41},
  pages={353-360}
}
Abstract Females of socially monogamous species may copulate with attractive non-mates to obtain access to the genes of such males, and a preference for attractive copulation partners may result in sexual selection. Extra-pair copulations are common in the socially monogamous barn swallow Hirundorustica, and a 2-year study of paternity using multi-locus DNA fingerprinting demonstrated that 33% of 63 broods and 28% of 261 offspring were sired by extra-pair males. The frequency of extra-pair… 
Extra-pair paternity and mate-guarding behaviour in the brown thornbill
TLDR
It is speculated that the relationship between male size/age and extra-pair paternity in brown thornbill may arise because female thornbills prefer large males as mates but are unable to express this preference as easily when paired to older males.
Breeding synchrony and paternity in the barn swallow (Hirundo rustica)
TLDR
It is suggested that females might delay breeding with low-quality males to enhance their opportunities for being fertilised by high-quality extra-pair males.
EXTRA-PAIR PATERNITY IN GREAT TITS (PARUS MAJOR)-A LONG TERM STUDY
TLDR
Paternity in a study on great tits over 5 years was analysed and results do not fit the predictions of the 'good genes' hypothesis, suggesting that factors other than the genetic quality of males play an important role in determining if a particular female or male has extra-pair young in its brood.
Low Level of Extra-Pair Paternity in a Population of the Barn Swallow Hirundo Rustica Gutturalis
TLDR
It is recorded the lowest levels of paternity loss ever reported in a population of Barn Swallows Hirundo rustica, and the levels of extra-pair paternity were below 5% of offspring, which is considered worthy of explanation in monogamous birds.
Sexual selection in a socially monogamous bird: male color predicts paternity success in the mountain bluebird, Sialia currucoides
TLDR
The results support the hypothesis that the brilliant UV-blue ornamental plumage of male mountain bluebirds evolved at least in part because it provides males with an advantage in fertilizing the eggs of multiple females.
MELANIN-BASED COLOURATION AS A SIGNAL OF INDIVIDUAL QUALITY AND ITS POTENTIAL ROLE IN SEXUAL SELECTION IN THE BARN SWALLOW (HIRUNDO RUSTICA)
TLDR
Female promiscuity and its phenotypic correlates, and composition of the social pair, deserve closer attention in studies of sexual selection mediated by extra-bond 43.
The cost of infidelity to female reed buntings
TLDR
If the mixed mating system of the reed bunting is at an evolutionary equilibrium, it is expected that genetic fitness for males as well as for females is maximized and any costs incurred by extrapair mating should not exceed the benefits for both sexes.
No evidence for adjustment of sex allocation in relation to paternal ornamentation and paternity in barn swallows
TLDR
Assessment of adjustment of sex ratio of offspring in relation to ornamentation of the extra‐pair and the social mate of females by direct manipulation of tails of male barn swallows Hirundo rustica found it to be stable.
Male tail streamer length predicts fertilization success in the North American barn swallow (Hirundo rustica erythrogaster)
TLDR
Results are consistent with the idea that there is directional sexual selection on male tail streamer length, possibly mediated through male extra-pair mating success or the timing of breeding onset.
Extrapair paternity as a cost of polygyny in the rock sparrow: behavioural and genetic evidence of the ‘trade-off’ hypothesis
TLDR
It is suggested that mate guarding can be efficient in preventing cuckoldry, and that there is a trade-off between attracting an additional mate and protecting paternity in the rock sparrow, whereas male age and phenotype were, at best, fair predictors of paternity.
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TLDR
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