Extra-pair paternity and intraspecific brood parasitism in wild zebra finches Taeniopygia guttata, revealed by DNA fingerprinting

@article{Birkhead2004ExtrapairPA,
  title={Extra-pair paternity and intraspecific brood parasitism in wild zebra finches Taeniopygia guttata, revealed by DNA fingerprinting},
  author={Tim R. Birkhead and Terry A Burke and Richard A. Zann and Fiona M. Hunter and Andrew P. Krupa},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2004},
  volume={27},
  pages={315-324}
}
SummaryThe frequency of extra-pair parentage in a wild population of zebra finches Taeniopygia guttata was examined by DNA fingerprinting. A total of 25 families, comprising 16 pairs of parents and 92 offspring (in broods of 1 to 6) were examined. Ten cases of extra-pair parentage, presumed to constitute intraspecific brood parasitism, were detected (10.9% of offspring or 36% of broods), including one possible instance of ‘quasi-parasitism’ (parasitism by a female fertilized by the male nest… 
Extra-pair paternity and the opportunity for sexual selection in a socially monogamous bird (Dendroica petechia)
TLDR
The findings affirm the potential importance of extra-pair reproduction for sexual selection in monogamous species and they support earlier suggestions that extra-territorial forays by male yellow warblers are for the purpose ofextra-pair mating.
Low incidence of extra-pair paternity in the colonially nesting common swift Apus apus
The frequency of extra-pair paternity in a wild colony of swifts Apus apus was determined by multilocus DNA fingerprinting in two successive breeding seasons. The data were used to examine the
High fidelity: extra-pair fertilisations in eight Charadrius plover species are not associated with parental relatedness or social mating system
TLDR
The low prevalence of EPP is consistent with a number of alternative hypotheses, including the parental investment hypothesis, which suggests that high contribution to care by males restricts female plovers from engaging in extra-pair copulations, and critically test the importance of this hypothesis for mate choice in plovers.
Extra-pair paternity in tree swallows: why do females mate with more than one male?
TLDR
It is suggested that most extra- Pair copulations occur at some unknown location, possibly at a feeding or roosting area where females may be able to choose from many more potential extra-pair fathers than at their nest-site.
Linking nest predation with brood parasitism in captive zebra finches: a multi-pair study
TLDR
This study investigated the role of nest loss as a proximate trigger for parasitism in a more naturalistic setting: small groups consisting of three pairs per aviary, and found that females responded to nest removal during the egg-laying period by laying eggs in active neighbouring nests.
Evidence of extra-pair paternity in two socially monogamous Australian passerines: the Crescent Honeyeater and the Yellow-faced Honeyeater
TLDR
Analysis of molecular assignment of paternity in two species of Australian honeyeater (Meliphagidae), which have only recently had their social mating systems described, finds extensive extra-pair paternity in both the Yellow-faced Honeyeater and Crescent HoneyEater.
Extra-pair paternity and male characteristics in the pied flycatcher
TLDR
It is argued that females paired with genetically dissimilar males may try to avoid the effects of extreme outbreeding by seeking extra-pair copulations (EPCs).
Host–parasite kinship in a female‐philopatric bird population: evidence from relatedness trend analysis
TLDR
B brood parasitism in a Hudson Bay population of common eiders is analysed, testing predictions from two alternative hypotheses on the role of relatedness, and the results refute the hypothesis that parasites avoid laying eggs in the nests of related hosts, and corroborate the alternative of host–parasite relatedness.
Low level of extrapair parentage in wild zebra finches
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 52 REFERENCES
Intraspecific brood parasitism in the European Starling
TLDR
Intraspecific brood parasitism in the European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris) in New Jersey was studied and it was found that hosts from parasitized nests of the electrophoresis sample fledged fewer young than nonparasitized nests.
Parental care and mating behaviour of polyandrous dunnocks Prunella modularis related to paternity by DNA fingerprinting
TLDR
It is shown that in the dunnock Prunella modularis, a small passerine bird with a variable mating system, males do not discriminate between their own young and those of another male in multiply-sired broods, which is a good predictor of paternity.
Genetic evidence of multiple parentage in broods of cliff swallows
TLDR
It is suggested that multiple parentage in cliff swallows results more often from intraspecific brood parasitism than from forced extra-pair copulations.
Extra-pair fertilizations in mountain white-crowned sparrows
TLDR
A population of white-crowned sparrows located near Tioga Pass, in the central Sierra Nevada of California, was studied to determine how often chicks were not the offspring of both adults who reared them, raising new questions about sexual selection and patterns of parental care in monogamous birds.
Egg removal and intraspecific brood parasitism in the European starling (Sturnus vulgaris)
TLDR
From 1983 to 1986, 284 European starling nests in New Jersey were monitored for evidence of intraspecific brood parasitism and egg removal during the laying period to hypothesize that parasite females sometimes removed host eggs while parasitizing nests.
No evidence for illegitimate young in monogamous and polygynous warblers
TLDR
The use of a bird minisatellite DNA probe is described in assigning paternity in natural populaá-tions of the monogamous willow warbler Phylloscopus trochilus and of the polygynous wood warblerPhylloscopeopus sibilatrix, implying that extra-pair copulations have little or no genetic impact.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...