Extra-intestinal localization of Goussia sp. (Apicomplexa) oocysts in Rana dalmatina (Anura: Ranidae), and the fate of infection after metamorphosis.

@article{Jirk2006ExtraintestinalLO,
  title={Extra-intestinal localization of Goussia sp. (Apicomplexa) oocysts in Rana dalmatina (Anura: Ranidae), and the fate of infection after metamorphosis.},
  author={M. Jirků and D. Modr{\'y}},
  journal={Diseases of aquatic organisms},
  year={2006},
  volume={70 3},
  pages={
          237-41
        }
}
  • M. Jirků, D. Modrý
  • Published 2006
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Diseases of aquatic organisms
  • Although coccidia of the genus Goussia are common parasites of fish, only 2 species have been described in amphibians: G. hyperolisi from common reed frogs Hyperolius viridiflavus from Kenya and G. neglecta from unspecified European water frogs of the genus Rana from Germany. The genus Goussia is characterized by an oocyst, with a fine oocyst wall, containing 4 dizoic sporocysts that are composed of 2 valves joined by a longitudinal suture and lacking a Stieda body (typical for the genus… CONTINUE READING
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