Extinction of the acoustic startle response in moths endemic to a bat‐free habitat

@article{Fullard2004ExtinctionOT,
  title={Extinction of the acoustic startle response in moths endemic to a bat‐free habitat},
  author={James H. Fullard and John M Ratcliffe and Amanda R. SoutarA.R. Soutar},
  journal={Journal of Evolutionary Biology},
  year={2004},
  volume={17}
}
Most moths use ears solely to detect the echolocation calls of hunting, insectivorous bats and evoke evasive flight manoeuvres. This singularity of purpose predicts that this sensoribehavioural network will regress if the selective force that originally maintained it is removed. We tested this with noctuid moths from the islands of Tahiti and Moorea, sites where bats have never existed and where an earlier study demonstrated that the ears of endemic species resemble those of adventives although… Expand
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