Extinction and the zoogeography of West Indian land mammals

@article{Morgan1986ExtinctionAT,
  title={Extinction and the zoogeography of West Indian land mammals},
  author={G. Morgan and C. Woods},
  journal={Biological Journal of The Linnean Society},
  year={1986},
  volume={28},
  pages={167-203}
}
The timing and causes of extinctions of West Indian land mammals during three time intervals covering the last 20000 years (late Pleistocene and early Holocene, Amerindian, and post-Columbian) are discussed in detail. Late Pleistocene extinctions are attributed to climatic change and the post-glacial rise in sea level, whereas most late Holocene extinctions are probably human caused, resulting from predation, habitat destruction and introduction of exotic species. Extinctions have dramatically… Expand
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